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Person Record

Name Broder, Samuel
Occupation In 1970, on graduating from medical school, Samuel Broder performed both his internship and residency at Stanford University Medical Center. In 1972, he joined the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a Clinical Associate. His initial assignment was in the Metabolism Branch where he carried out research on immunodeficiency related disorders. NIH laboratories were located close to the hospital wards, allowing interchange between the laboratory and the clinic, which he considered crucial. In 1975, Broder was promoted to Investigator in the Medicine Branch. After one year in that position he was appointed Senior Investigator, back in the Metabolism Branch. Broder's research involved studies aimed to clarify the relationship between the immune system and cancer. His promotion in 1981, to Associate Director of the Division of Cancer Treatment, came at almost the same time that physicians in San Francisco were puzzled by clusters of an unusual form of pneumonia among male homosexuals. More detailed studies on these patients revealed that their immune system had in effect been completely destroyed. The cause of this disease, now called Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, AIDS, was soon identified as retro-virus dubbed Human Immunodeficiency Virus, or HIV. A sense of urgency developed as cases of this fatal disease accumulated. The NCI's DCT, as a result of its ongoing research on the immune system, was uniquely positioned to tackle this disease. Equally important was that DCT had experience and facilities for developing anti-cancer drugs including a long-standing project for acquiring compounds from industry and academia for assay in the the NCI anti-cancer screen. The calls made by Broder to solicit compounds for screening against HIV met a positive response at Burroughs-Welcome (now Glaxo) a company that had an ongoing anti-viral program. One of the compounds they contributed for testing was azidothymine, an agent that had been synthesized in 1962 as a potential antitumor agent. Though inactive against cancer, AZT as it became known, did inhibit selected viruses. Developed by scientists from BW and NCI, AZT became the first drug for treating humans infected with HIV. In 1987, the FDA approved the drug for use in patients; AZT is still used particularly for protecting infants from HIV positive mothers. Towards the end of 1988, Broder was appointed NCI Director. In 1995, he resigned from the Government to assume the position of Senior Vice-President-Research and Development and Chief Scientific Officer of IVAX Pharmaceuticals in Florida. He left that company in 1998, at which time he was appointed Chief Medical Officer of Celera Genomics.
No Archives 1
No Objects 1
No Photos 10
Birthplace Detroit, MI
Born Feb. 24, 1945
Education University of Michigan, B.S., 1966
University of Michigan Medical School, M.D., 1970

Associated Records

Image of 15.0017.001 - Release, News

15.0017.001 - Release, News

.01 1984, April: "Cancer Facts: NCI Isolates AIDS Virus" (original) .02 1985, June: "Update: Immunologic Abnormalities Among DC Homosexuals with Contacts from High-Risk AIDS Areas" (original) .03 1986, February: "Update: AIDS Development in HTLV-III Infected Individuals" (original--PDF on AIDS & NIH website) .04 1986, May: "Backgrounder: NCI AIDS Research" (original--PDF onlilne) .05 1986, July: "Backgrounder: NCI Research on Drugs to Treat AIS" (original) .06 1986, July: "Statement: Clinical Trials for AIDS Patients" (copy) .07 1986, September: "Fact Sheet: Viruses in Cancer and AIDS" (copy) .08 1986, September: "Update: HTLV-III Mutant Developed with Limited Cell-Killin

Image of National Cancer Institute - Samuel Broder

National Cancer Institute - Samuel Broder

Samuel Broder was a co-developer some of the first effective drugs for the treatment of AIDS. He served as Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from 1989 to 1995.

Image of United States Public Health Service - P.H.S. Navy Flag officers assigned to NIH

United States Public Health Service - P.H.S. Navy Flag officers assigned to NIH

Group of Public Health Service officers assigned to the National Institutes of Health. Overseen by the Surgeon General, the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps is a diverse team of more than 6,500 highly qualified, public health professionals.

Image of NIH Campus Visits - Senator Howell Heflin visits NIH

NIH Campus Visits - Senator Howell Heflin visits NIH

Senator Howell Heflin (D. AL) visits the National Institutes of Health. He is accompanied by the dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, Dr. James A. Pittman, Jr.

Image of NIH Directors - Visit to the NIH campus by Vice-President's wife Marilyn Quayle

NIH Directors - Visit to the NIH campus by Vice-President's wife Marilyn Quayle

NIH Director, Dr. Bernadine Healy with the United States Vice President's wife, Marilyn Quayle during a visit in October 1991.

Image of Events at NIH - Visit to the NIH campus by David Rockefeller, 6/1988

Events at NIH - Visit to the NIH campus by David Rockefeller, 6/1988

David Rockefeller, Sr. (1915 -), youngest child of John D. Rockefeller, is the honorary chair and life trustee of the Rockefeller University. The university is a world-renowned center for research and graduate education in the biomedical sciences, chemistry, bioinformatics and physics. The National Institutes of Health and the Rockefeller University have a history of collaboration.

Image of Events at NIH - Senator Dale Bumpers visit to NIH

Events at NIH - Senator Dale Bumpers visit to NIH

Senator Dale Bumpers (D. AR) visited the National Institutes of Health several times during his career. This visit shows Bumpers meeting with Dr. Anthony Fauci of NIAID and with NIH director James Wyngaarden and Dr. Ruth Kirschstein among others.

Image of NIH Campus Visits - Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski visit to NIH

NIH Campus Visits - Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski visit to NIH

The National Institutes of Health hosts visits each year by senators and others that are interested in biomedical research and funding. Senator Mikulski is the senior senator from the state of Maryland. She is Maryland's first female senator and currently the most senior female Senator, having served since 1987, and ranking 17th (out of 100) in seniority. This visit to NIH was in her first year of the Senate.

Image of Events at NIH - Dedication of the Mary Lasker Building

Events at NIH - Dedication of the Mary Lasker Building

Mary Woodard Lasker (1900-1994) worked to raise funds for medical research and founded the Lasker Foundation. A recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1969) Lasker was a tireless supporter for healthcare. In 1984 the National Institutes of Health dedicated the Mary Woodard Lasker Center for Health Research and Education in the Convent, the oldest building on the NIH campus.The Mary Lasker Papers are held at the National Library of Medicine and at Columbia University.

Image of Events at NIH - Sen. Tom Harkin visit to NIH

Events at NIH - Sen. Tom Harkin visit to NIH

Senator Tom Harkin (D. IA) visits the National Institutes of Health. Sen. Harkin visited with Dr. Fauci's laboratory at the NIAID along with several presentations. The National Institutes of Health hosts several visits each month from dignitaries and others that are interested in health care.