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Person Record

Name Huebner, Robert J.
No Archives 0
No Objects 3
No Photos 12

Associated Records

Image of 02.0021.002 - Slide, Lantern

02.0021.002 - Slide, Lantern

02.0021.002.01 - CARD: RS VIRUS (JV outbreak) Drs. Bell and Chanock each have a set 02.0021.002.02 - Incidence of Pneumonia & Serologic Evidence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RS) Infection in Infirmary and Cottage Populations 02.0021.002.03 - Onsets of Pneumonia in Study Group, April -May, 1960 02.0021.002.04 - Age in Relation to Illness During Outbreak Period, April 24, 1960-May 21, 1960 02.0021.002.05 - Respiratory Syncitial (RS) Virus Isolations and Onset of Febrile Pneumonia at Junior Village 02.0021.002.06 - Febrile Illness Experience of 14 Children in Infirmary with RS Virus Isolations at Time of Initial Isolation as Compared with that of the Same Children Immediately Before an

Image of 02.0021.004 - Card, Punch

02.0021.004 - Card, Punch

02.0021.004.01 - McBee punch card selector 02.0021.004.02 - punch card selector 02.0021.004.03 - McBee punch card punchers 02.0021.004.04 - McBee punch card punchers 02.0021.004.05 - .79 punch card (Dose, H, P, Int, Dur., R) 02.0021.004.80 - .170 punch card, large 02.0021.004.171 - punch card box .01 Stainless steel rod set into handle with "McBee, patent pending" stamped in. Top of the handles has lever with red plastic tumb holder; ones pushes on the lever to release the rod. .02 Long stainless steel rod. Handle is green plastic with metal screw to turn to loosen rod. Rod can be put in one of four holes. .03-4 Stainless steel. Spring between wide handles. When hand

02.0021.005 - Slide, Lantern

.01-.100 Lantern slides (first nine described below) .101 Wood case Lantern slides depict results of various epidemiological studies, particularly in children, of influenza vaccine studies. .01 Influenza--Vaccine Reactions (published paper): table 1, Bell, Vacc. Products, 3/61: Influenza Vaccine Products Administered 1951-1955 .02 Influenza--Vaccine Reactions (published paper): Reaction, fig. 1, Bell, 3/61,: Frequence of Respiratory & NonRespiratory Systemic Manifestations Following Influenza Vaccination by Occurrence of Fever According to Age and Vaccine Product (9755 persons observed) .03 Influenza--Vaccine Reactions (published paper): Reactions, 9/60 fig. 2, Bell, 3/6

Image of Faces of NIH - Dr. Robert Huebner and an Angus bull

Faces of NIH - Dr. Robert Huebner and an Angus bull

Dr. Robert Huebner holding an angus bull on Dr. Huebner’s farm near Fredrick, Maryland. Dr. Huebner received his M.D. in 1942 from the St. Louis University’s School of Medicine and then joined the U.S. Public Health Service, serving for two years on a Coast Guard vessel. He came to the National Microbiological Institute’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases in 1944. The institute became the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in 1955, and Dr. Huebner became chief of its Laboratory of Infectious Disease in 1956. In 1967 he became chief of the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Viral Carcinogenesis and he held this post until 1982 when he retired. Dr. Huebner conduct

Image of Office of History Photograph Collection - Dr. Robert Huebner with Victor Shednoff, USSR Deputy Minister of Health

Office of History Photograph Collection - Dr. Robert Huebner with Victor Shednoff, USSR Deputy Minister of Health

Dr. Robert Huebner talking to Victor Shednoff, the Soviet Deputy Minister of Health with other laboratory personnel that are unidentified. Dr. Huebner was one of six American virologists sent to visit the Soviet Union in 1961 by Abraham Ribicoff, then Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare (H.E.W.). Dr. Huebner served as the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Laboratory of Infectious Disease.

Image of Office of History Photograph Collection - American and Soviet virologists outside the Soviet Poliomyelitis Institute

Office of History Photograph Collection - American and Soviet virologists outside the Soviet Poliomyelitis Institute

Group of American and Soviet virologists in Nukava, Russia taken during a visit by a group of 6 American virologists to the USSR. The group of American scientists included Dr. Albert Sabin, Dr. Robert Huebner, Dr. Robert Chanock, Dr. Bill Hammon, Dr. Ed Lynette, and Dr. Fred Davenport. The Soviet scientists included Dr. Mikhail Petrovich Chumakov who is seated next to Dr. Huebner. Dr. Chumakov was the director of the Poliomyelitis Institute. Bella Kaplan, who was Dr. Chumakov’s aide, is seated on Dr. Huebner’s other side.

Image of Office of History Photograph Collection - Robert Huebner and Albert Sabin

Office of History Photograph Collection - Robert Huebner and Albert Sabin

Drs. Robert Huebner and Albert Sabin relaxing on the porch of Dr. Huebner’s farmhouse outside of Fredrick, Maryland in the early 1960s. At this time Dr. Huebner was the chief of the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases while Dr. Sabin was with the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Sabin is known for his discovery of the oral polio vaccine while Dr. Huebner conducted research on Q fever and rickettsialpox and the coxsackie viruses.

Image of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Dr. Robert Huebner

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Dr. Robert Huebner

Dr. Robert Huebner received his M.D. in 1942 from the St. Louis University’s School of Medicine and joined the U.S. Public Health Service, serving for two years on a Coast Guard vessel. He came to the National Microbiological Institute’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases in 1944. The institute became the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in 1955 and Huebner became chief of the Laboratory of Infectious Disease in 1956. In 1967 he became chief of the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Viral Carcinogenesis and he held this post until his retirement in1982. Huebner conducted research on the epidemiology of Q fever and ricettsialpox, and identified the coxsackie A v

Image of Office of History Photograph Collection - Robert Chanock and Robert Huebner at NIAID laboratory

Office of History Photograph Collection - Robert Chanock and Robert Huebner at NIAID laboratory

Drs. Robert Chanock and Robert Huebner in NIAID’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Chanock is seated at a microscope with a double ring of test tubes towards the back of the table with his laboratory notebook to his left. Dr. Huebner is seated in front of the lab notebook and turned toward Dr. Chanock. Taken in the mid 1960s during the time Dr. Huebner was the chief of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Laboratory of Infectious Disease, and Dr. Chanock was working under him as head of the Laboratory’s Respiratory Virus Section.

Image of Office of History Photograph Collection - Drs. Chanock, Sabin, Davis, and Huebner at the Hungarian Embassy

Office of History Photograph Collection - Drs. Chanock, Sabin, Davis, and Huebner at the Hungarian Embassy

Drs. Robert Chanock, Dorland Davis, Albert Sabin, and Robert Huebner at a reception at the Hungarian embassy in 1966. The reception was in honor of Dr. Sabin who was being inducted into the Hungarian Academy of Science after Hungary had conducted a mass immunization which had eradicated poliomyelitis. At this time Dr. Sabin was associated with the University of Cincinnati while the other three scientists were all working for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Dr. Dorland was the director of NIAID, and from 1954 to 1956 he had been head of its Laboratory of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Huebner had succeeded him in this post in 1956, and was himself succeeded by Dr. Chan

Image of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Dr. Robert Huebner in the laboratory

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Dr. Robert Huebner in the laboratory

Dr. Robert Huebner in the laboratory. Examining liquid in a vial under the microscope. In his left hand Dr. Huebner is holding a test tube, stoppered with cotton. There are several more test tubes stoppered with cotton just beyond his left arm. Dr. Huebner was the chief of the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the time this photograph was taken.

Image of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Kew Gardens, NY rickettsialpox outbreak

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Kew Gardens, NY rickettsialpox outbreak

Kew Garden apartment basements, New York, NY. The incinerators are filled with material that is only partially burned and which attracted mice. The mice were hosts to mites which carried rickettsialpox. Shown are mattresses from a daybed and a sofabed which were infested with mites. The Kew Gardens apartments in New York City were the site of an outbreak of rickettsialpox in 1946. This disease was identified by Dr. Jellison, Dr. Robert Huebner, and Charles Pomerantz. Dr. Jellison was an entomologist with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory while Dr. Huebner was a researcher at the National Microbiological Institute’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases. Mr. Pomerantz was an exterminator and am

Image of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Robert Huebner  and William Jellison at Kew Gardens field laboratory

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Robert Huebner and William Jellison at Kew Gardens field laboratory

Dr. Robert Huebner at work in the U.S. Public Health Service’s field laboratory in the Kew Gardens apartment complex in New York. Dr. Huebner is using scissors and forceps to dissect a mouse. Of note, protective clothing such as gloves or masks are not in use. Dr. Huebner and Dr. William Jellison are in the laboratory. Jellison served as an entomologist with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory. Dr. Huebner was a researcher at the National Microbiological Institute’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases. Huebner and Jellison were sent to Kew Gardens in New York City to help investigate an outbreak of rickettsialpox.

Image of United States Public Health Service - Public Health Service in New York City

United States Public Health Service - Public Health Service in New York City

Dr. Robert Huebner joined the National Institutes of Health in 1944. He was the only Public Health Service officer on duty in his institute when he received a call from New York City authorities requesting his help to identify a disease among residents of crowded apartments in the Kew Gardens section of Queens. Examination of the infected occupants led to the discovery of the first known case of rickettsialpox, a variety of the diseases caused by rickettsia. The mites, infected with the previously unknown variety of rickettsia, were inadvertently brought to the United States in the luggage of Russian immigrants.