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Person Record

Name Jellison, William L.
No Archives 0
No Objects 1
No Photos 9

Associated Records

Image of 14.0028.001 - Book

14.0028.001 - Book

Black leather binder, labeled with tape on spine "Flea Index, 1942." Stapled to front is a plastic packet containing copy of cover of NIH Bulletin No. 178. Inside the cover there is tape with "My only copy please return WLJ". Inside, pages of Bulleting 178 on binder rings with handwritten notes in pen on many pages.

Image of Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - Dr. William L. Jellison next to Ricketts Road

Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - Dr. William L. Jellison next to Ricketts Road

Dr William L. Jellison next to the Rickets Road sign in Ravalli County, Montana. Dr. Jellison is holding a piece of paper about Ravalli County Roads 1974. The road was named for Dr. Howard Ricketts who designed the experiment that first demonstrated the tick transmission of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Dr. Ricketts also identified the fever’s causative organism. Dr. Jellison served as an entomologist who received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1940. He first joined the U.S. Public Health Service in 1929 as an assistant bacteriologist and in 1931 became an entomologist and parasitologist for the laboratory. Dr. Jellison conducted research on the epidemology of tularemia,

Image of Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - Depiction of lesion from mouse mite bite

Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - Depiction of lesion from mouse mite bite

Lesion caused by the bite of the mouse mite on the arm of Dr. William Jellison. The lesion is a light colored spot surrounded by a darker area. The mouse mite was the carrier of rickettsialpox which was identified by Dr. Jellison, Dr. Robert Huebner, and Charles Pomerantz during an outbreak in 1946 at the Kew Gardens apartments in New York City. Dr. Jellison was an entomologist with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory.

Image of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Kew Gardens, NY rickettsialpox outbreak

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Kew Gardens, NY rickettsialpox outbreak

Kew Garden apartment basements, New York, NY. The incinerators are filled with material that is only partially burned and which attracted mice. The mice were hosts to mites which carried rickettsialpox. Shown are mattresses from a daybed and a sofabed which were infested with mites. The Kew Gardens apartments in New York City were the site of an outbreak of rickettsialpox in 1946. This disease was identified by Dr. Jellison, Dr. Robert Huebner, and Charles Pomerantz. Dr. Jellison was an entomologist with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory while Dr. Huebner was a researcher at the National Microbiological Institute’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases. Mr. Pomerantz was an exterminator and am

Image of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Dr. William Jellison and Charles Pomerantz at Kew Gardens

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Dr. William Jellison and Charles Pomerantz at Kew Gardens

Dr. William Jellison and Charles Pomerantz at work in the U.S. Public Health Service field laboratory set up in the basement of the Kew Gardens apartments in New York City, NY. Images include Dr. Jellison preparing a microscope slide and using a microscope. Dr. Jellison and Mr. Pomerantz examine white laboratory mice and examine the floor plans of the apartment complex. Dr. Jellison was an entomologist with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory and Mr. Pomerantz was an amateur entomologist who collaborated with the authorities in the investigation of an outbreak of rickettsialpox at the Kew Gardens apartments in 1946.

Image of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Robert Huebner  and William Jellison at Kew Gardens field laboratory

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Robert Huebner and William Jellison at Kew Gardens field laboratory

Dr. Robert Huebner at work in the U.S. Public Health Service’s field laboratory in the Kew Gardens apartment complex in New York. Dr. Huebner is using scissors and forceps to dissect a mouse. Of note, protective clothing such as gloves or masks are not in use. Dr. Huebner and Dr. William Jellison are in the laboratory. Jellison served as an entomologist with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory. Dr. Huebner was a researcher at the National Microbiological Institute’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases. Huebner and Jellison were sent to Kew Gardens in New York City to help investigate an outbreak of rickettsialpox.

Image of Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - Dr. William L. Jellison

Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - Dr. William L. Jellison

Dr. William L. Jellison joined the U.S. Public Health Service Rocky Mountain Laboratory in 1929 as an assistant bacteriologist. In1931 he became an entomologist and parasitologist at the laboratory, and in 1934 received his Ph.D. in entomology from Stanford University. Dr. Jellison conducted research on the epidemology of tularemia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, encephalitits, and Q fever as wekk as research on ectoparasites.

Image of Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - William L. Jellison in the Pribilof Islands

Rocky Mountain Laboratory Photographs - William L. Jellison in the Pribilof Islands

The United States Public Health Service sent officers to collect samples for research. William Jellison, an entomologist, was stationed in Hamilton, Montanan and conducted field research in the Northwest and Pacific Northwest of the United States. The Pribilof Islands (formerly the Northern Fur Seal Islands) are a group of four volcanic islands off the coast of mainland Alaska, in the Bering Sea, about 200 miles (320 km) north of Unalaska and 200 miles southwest of Cape Newenham.